The Garrison Road United Brethren Church (Fort Erie, Ontario) is a congregation of about 65 adults who have a desire to reach their community for Christ, with a particular emphasis on young families. The church has a large, functional facility in an ideal location on the main road in the heart of a community with new, growing subdivisions nearby. A brand new high school has just opened only three blocks from the church. Fort Erie is just across the Niagara River from Buffalo, New York, and just 20 minutes south of Niagara Falls.

The church has a blend of contemporary and traditional worship. Garrison Road Church is part of The United Brethren Church in Canada (see ubcanada.org for more information).

Resumes should be sent to Bishop Brian Magnus by August 15th. Email: brian@parkwoodgardens.ca. Contact Bishop Magnus for a full job description.

Margaret Maybee

Margaret Louise Maybee, 84, passed away Friday, July 26, 2019, at Henry Ford Allegiance Hospice Home. She was surrounded by her loving family.

Ever since she was a little girl, her life’s mission was to be a pastor’s wife. That life mission became a reality when Margaret married the love of her life, Milan Maybee, on June 26, 1954, in Mt. Pleasant, Mich. She loved being a wife, mother, grandmother, church secretary, organist, pianist, worship director, and Sunday school teacher. She was an active member of the Heart O’Lakes United Brethren Church (Brooklyn, Mich.) and Eden UB church (Mason, Mich.). Margaret was also a dedicated employee of Borek Jennings Funeral Homes for many years. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her and loved her.

Margaret is survived by her husband of 65 years, Rev. Milan Maybee, three children, seven grandchildren, and 16 great-grandchildren.

Margaret’s family and friends will gather Sunday, July 28, 2019, from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm at Heart O’ the Lakes United Brethren Church (7031 Jefferson Rd., Brooklyn) where her Service of Remembrance will be held at 5:00 pm. Pastor Tim Flickinger and Pastor Cyle Young will officiate. Memorial contributions are suggested to Heart O’ the Lakes: Missions or Yucatan Blessing House.

You can view her online obituary and leave a message of comfort for the family here.

Cards for Milan Maybee can be sent to:

Milan G. Maybee
101 Burt Ave.
Jackson, MI 49201

Bishop Todd Fetters (left) with the persons participating in the ordination services.

Rev. Chuck McKeown (right) praying for the persons being ordained, including (on the left) Julie and Joshua McKeown.

Daniel and Michelle Friend kneeling for the laying on of hands.

Dan Friend receiving a Bible from Bishop Todd Fetters.

Christopher and Elizabeth Little kneeling for the laying on of hands.

Christopher Little V receiving a Bible from Bishop Todd Fetters.

Joshua and Julie McKeown kneeling for the laying on of hands.

Matthew and Kara McKeown kneeling for the laying on of hands.

Matt McKeown received a Bible from Bishop Todd Fetters, and his father, Chuck, looks on.

Four persons were ordained during the recent US National Conference in Bowling Green, Ohio. The service occurred on Saturday morning, July 20.

Bishop Todd Fetters conducted the four ceremonies, along with Rev. Jim Bolich, director of Ministerial Licensing and Ordination. They were assisted by two ordained elders chosen by the person being ordained.

Christopher Little V is associate pastor of Devonshire UB church in Harrisburg, Pa. This fall he will begin planting what will be called the United House Church Network in Harrisburg. Assisting were Rev. Derek Thrush, senior pastor of Devonshire Church, and Dr. Michael Dittman, National Ministries director for the US National Conference.

Daniel L. Friend is Director of Music at Emmanuel Community Church in Fort Wayne, Ind. He has served at Emmanuel since 2002. He holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from Huntington University. Assisting were Rev. Craig Mickey, a staff minister at Emmanuel, and Rev. Jason Holliday, a former Emmanuel staffperson who is now senior pastor of Living Grace UB church in Fort Wayne.

Matthew T. McKeown is associate pastor of First UB church in Holly Hill, Fla. He has served there since 1998. His brother Joshua McKeown has been senior pastor of Faith UB church in Port Orange, Fla., since August 2017.

Assisting in both ordinations was their father, Rev. Chuck McKeown, who is senior pastor of First UB. Rev. Brent Liechty, senior pastor of Rising Hope UB church (Shippensburg, Pa.) also assisted in Matt’s ordination. Rev. Don Ross, senior pastor of Victory Chapel UB church (Liberty Center, Ohio), assisted in Joshua’s ordination.

Rev. Taylor Sharp, a retired United Brethren pastor and ordained minister, passed away July 14, 2019, at his residence in Nashville, Ill. He was 90 years old.

Sharp graduated from Huntington University in 1953 with a degree in Sociology, and graduated from the Huntington University seminary in 1956 with a Master of Divinity. He pastored United Brethren churches in Lakewood and Modesto, Calif., 1956-1965. He was ordained in 1957.

From 1967-1975, Sharp served as a chaplain in the US Army (under the NAE Commission on Chaplains). He then became associate pastor of Morning Star UB church (Kokomo, Ind.), and later senior pastor of Crestview UB church (Lafayette, Ind.). He retired in 1989, and retained membership at College Park UB church (Huntington, Ind.).

Sharp is survived by his wife, Donna. They were married in 1952 and, in June of this year, celebrated 67 years of marriage.

The funeral was held July 19 in Nashville, Ill., with son Pastor Scott Sharp officiating.

Your church should bring a busload or car caravan of people to a service at the upcoming US National Conference. Or to several services.

The evening services, and the closing service on Saturday morning, are open for anyone to attend. You don’t need to have registered for the conference. Come join the nearly 700 UBs who have registered, and let’s fill the place!

The convention is July 17-20. The evening services start at 6:30. Daniel Henderson will speak Wednesday and Thursday nights on prayer, which will be a continuing emphasis for Bishop Todd Fetters; it would be great if you could. Friday night is Missions Night, with David Datema speaking. Bishop Todd Fetters will speak on Saturday morning at 9:00 am, presenting some of his vision for the denomination.

Organize a road trip with some of your fellow parishioners. We’d love to see you there!

The conference will be held at Bowling Green State University in the Bowen student union center.

The 6th Annual Marriage Retreat for United Brethren Pastoral Couples will be held August 12-14, 2019, at Rhodes Grove Camp & Conference Center in Chambersburg, Pa.

Instead of our usual “Marriage Retreat,” this year’s event is more of a “Spiritual Retreat.” Plan to get away for a few days with other pastoral couples, retreat from the daily grind of ministry, and reconnect spiritually.

There is no cost. This three-day, two-night retreat is sponsored in full by the United Brethren National Office, the United Brethren Association for Church Development, and Rhodes Grove Camp.

This retreat is reserved for pastors and spouses serving in United Brethren in Christ churches.

The retreat this year will be guided by Mike Dean, pastor of Living Waters UB church in Winchester, Va.

Register using this PDF form.

We’re a month away from the start of the US National Conference. Registration is now up to around 640! There’s still time to register. Go here for complete information.

Thursday Morning Business Session

Various reports have been posted in PDF format on the UB website, so delegates can read and download them. These include the proposals for revising the Discipline, reports from denominational officials, and the Nominating Committee report.

Workshops

Three rounds of workshops will be held on Friday morning from 9:00 to noon. Each workshop will be 45 minutes long. The workshops are now listed on the UB.org website.

The Fowlerville UB church (Fowlerville, Mich.) hosted the 4th annual Opiate Awareness Community Forum on May 30.

The local police chief, John Tyler, opened the event with an introduction to the epidemic. He said that in 2018, opioids accounted for more deaths than the entirety of the Vietnam War.

Various other agencies participated, sharing their own perspective on the crisis–the county Community Alliance and Catholic Charities, Celebrate Recovery, and others.

June Baker

June M. Baker, 85, passed away April 15, 2019, in Chambersburg, Pa. She was the wife of Rev. Paul B. Baker. They were married in 1953 and served 36 years in pastoral ministry in the United Brethren church. For 30 of those years, Paul was senior pastor of King Street UB church in Chambersburg, the denomination’s largest congregation.

June grew up in Chambersburg, taught Sunday school for over 40 years, and was employed for 24 years with F&M Trust Company. She is survived by her husband and their son, Jeffrey.

A memorial service was held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 20, at King Street Church. Rev. Jody Bowser, the current pastor, and Rev. Kevin Witter officiated.

Condolences can be send to Rev. Paul Baker at this address:

Rev. Paul Baker
c/o King Street Church
162 E King Street
Chambersburg, PA 17201

Steve Dennie, UB Communications Director

As we enter Memorial Day weekend….The Religious Telescope, our denominational magazine during the 1800s, recorded the obituaries of nearly 900 United Brethren men who died fighting for the Union during the Civil War. They included about 35 UB ministers, and 40 sons of UB ministers. As a denomination, we were fully committed to the Union cause.

On March 11, 1864, Thomas Evans enlisted as a private in the Union army. He was 38 years old, not a young man like so many Civil War soldiers. He left a wife and seven children at home in Newport, Iowa. And he was not, then, a Christian. But he had some kind of United Brethren connection.

Evans was born in Delaware, but made his way west with the growing nation. He and Nancy were married in 1847 in Indiana, but eventually settled in Iowa. Then came war. Thomas said good-bye to his wife and children for the last time, and left home to join the 24th Iowa Infantry, Company D.

Within eight months, Thomas would die of wounds received in the battle of Cedar Creek, the culminating battle of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of late 1864. It was a costly Union victory, with 644 killed, 3,430 wounded, and nearly 1600 taken prisoner. But it helped seal the fate of the Confederacy.

Evans’ obituary was published in The Religious Telescope, the United Brethren bi-weekly newspaper at the time. Perhaps he was what we called a “Seeker,” a category of membership for persons “giving evidence that they are sincerely seeking the Lord.” Nancy would soon become a United Brethren member, so there was probably a UB church there in Newport, or nearby. The UB presence was fairly thick in that part of Iowa.

If Thomas was, indeed, a Seeker, he had help for that journey while in the army. The Religious Telescope published the obituaries over 90 Iowa men who died serving in uniform. They included several United Brethren ministers, and laypersons from ages 17 to 59. They were spread among 32 infantry regiments and six cavalry regiments. We can assume that, in addition to these 90 fallen soldiers, hundreds of additional United Brethren men from Iowa served in and survived the war.

Six of those fallen men served in the 24th Iowa Infantry alongside Thomas Evans. Two of them were the sons of United Brethren preachers.

Abram Hershey, 59, was the son of Rev. Christian Hershey, who had basically started the UB church in Lisbon, Iowa. The Hersheys were from Lancaster, Pa., the birthplace of United Brethrenism. When Rev. Hershey came to Lisbon in 1847, a year after Iowa achieved statehood, he brought a bunch of relatives with him, including his son Abram and Abram’s large family. Other Pennsylvanians also came, enough that histories refer to the “Pennsylvania Settlement.” The Iowa Conference was organized at Lisbon in 1849, with Christian Hershey as one of the charter members, and Lisbon became perhaps the most prominent church in the conference.

Abram’s three oldest sons—Christian, John, and Henry Harrison—all enlisted in the Union army. Christian and John enlisted together on September 3, 1862, in the 24th Iowa Infantry. Christian was discharged for disability in May 1863—perhaps wounds, but more likely, sickness. But his father, Abram, signed up on March 3, 1864, to take Christian’s place.

Thomas Evans enlisted on March 11, 1864, just eight days after Abram. Though they were in different companies of the 24th—Abram and his sons in Company F, Thomas in Company D—we can assume that they at least got acquainted on their journey to join the regiment. But it’s quite likely that they already knew each other, since they lived just 16 miles apart.

Of the three brothers, John Hershey had the more distinguished military career. By May 1863, he had been promoted to sergeant. Then came 1864, quite an eventful year for him. First, his father joined Company F. Two months later, on April 8, John was severely wounded in the battle of Mansfield, La., a Union defeat (it is also known as the Battle of Sabine Cross Roads). Two months later, on June 13, his father, Abram, died of disease aboard a steamer near New Orleans. John recovered from his wounds, and then was wounded again, this time slightly, on September 19 at the battle of Opequon, also known as the third battle of Winchester, Va.

A month later, on October 19, John was taken prisoner at the battle of Cedar Creek, Va., the same battle in which Thomas Evans was mortally wounded. John, fortunately, was soon paroled in a prisoner exchange and would survive the war.

Another UB from the 24th died at Cedar Creek—George S. Smith, 23, who lived 14 miles from Evans. He was born in Germany, but was now living in Mount Vernon, Iowa, with a wife and three children. He had fought for two years before dying on the battlefield. He joined William O. Huyck, another young soldier from Mount Vernon, with whom he had enlisted in Company F in August 1862. Huyck, 30, a native of Ohio, died of disease on January 5, 1863.

Another UB preacher’s kid in the 24th was William Otterbein Miller, who was obviously named after founding bishop Philip William Otterbein. He was the son of Rev. Martin Miller, a pastor in Iowa Conference who, like the Hersheys, had come from Pennsylvania. Miller was wounded on September 19 at the battle of Opequon, and finally died of his wounds on February 13, 1865.

No doubt various other United Brethren served alongside Thomas Evans in the 24th regiment. Western College, a UB school located 18 miles from the Evans home, contributed a large number of students to the war effort. Then there would have been Christians from like-minded denominations like the Methodist and Evangelical churches. In fact, the 24th was sometimes called the “Methodist” regiment.

Thomas apparently sought God as a soldier. And it was as a soldier that he finally surrendered his life to Christ. It happened one night while he was on picket duty. Perhaps he was alone, but probably not. Was another UB with him when he committed his life to Jesus, between glances at the rebel pickets across the way? How might his decision have been influenced through interactions with Abram and John Hershey, George Smith, and William Otterbein Miller?

We don’t know how or when it happened, but it apparently did.

On October 19, 1864, Thomas Evans was severely wounded at the battle of Cedar Creek. His right forearm was amputated and he was hospitalized in Baltimore. But on November 5, he succumbed to his wounds.

A chaplain was there at his deathbed. According to Evans’ obituary in The Religious Telescope, “He told the chaplain that all he had to regret was that his children had never heard their father pray.”

The obituary added that Nancy Evans, Thomas’s wife, subsequently became a Christian and joined the local United Brethren church.