Charles Brady, 99, a business professor at Huntington University for 27 years (1958-1986), passed away Monday, March 29, 2021. He held the title of Associate Professor Emeritus of Business and Economics.

During his time in the Department of Business, the department grew from three graduates in 1959 to comprise about one fourth of the student body by the time he retired. He always had a “deep conviction for the need of committed Christian business graduates.”

Visitation: 1-4 pm Saturday, April 3, 2021.
Location: Myers Funeral Home Huntington Chapel, 2901 Guilford St., Huntington, IN 46750.l
Memorial Service: Friday, April 16, 2021.
Service location: College Park UB church (Huntington, Ind.).

Charles was born in Missouri in 1922. He enlisted in the US Armed Forced in 1942–his senior year of college–and served for three years in Hawaii, Okinawa, and Korea. Following his honorable discharge as a sergeant, he returned to Northwest Missouri State University to receive his degree in business administration. Mr. Brady then went on to teach business, earn his Master of Arts degree from Northern Colorado University, and became superintendent of a small high school in Kansas.

He taught high school for six years and spent seven years as superintendent of school in Kansas. Then, in 1959, Huntington University president Dr. Elmer Becker recruited him to come teach at Huntington.

Charles and Doris Brady were married in 1947. They were longtime members of College Park UB church in Huntington. They both served the church in various ways over the years. Charles also represented the church as a delegate to Central Annual Conference and served on the conference finance committee. After retiring from the college in 1986, he served as interim camp director for Camp Cotubic (Belfontaine, Ohio) and Camp Living Waters (Luther, Mich.). Doris passed away in November 2019. They are survived by a son and daughter.

“Charles Brady provided a clear example of Christ, scholarship and service to the community at Huntington University,” said Dr. Sherilyn Emberton, current president of HU. “He and his wife, Doris, were loyal supporters of all things Huntington and were seen many years after their retirements as faithful attendees in support of student and staff events. We are forever blessed by Mr. Brady’s love for his students and the Forester Family.”

Today is the Huntington University Day of Giving. They set a goal of $100,000, which will go toward student scholarships. As of 9:30 am, $38,000 had been given. They keep a real-time running total of the gifts, so you can check throughout the day.

The Day of Giving page includes a map of the United States. The first gift in every state unlocks an additional $300, and that state is turned from gray to Forester green. As of 9:30 am, just six states were green–Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, and Idaho. The goal is to turn every state green (and claim that $300 for each turned state).

Another 16 states have United Brethren churches. It would be great for all of those states to be green by the end of the day.

Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb cuts the ribbon for the building.

The Don Strauss Animal Science Education Center

HU President Dr. Sherilyn Emberton speaking at the dedication.

Inside the 10,000-square-foot center.

Huntington University held a ribbon-cutting for the new Don Strauss Animal Science Education Center on Monday afternoon, November 16. Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb did the honors with some very large scissors.

Construction began in early 2020. The building, located along Route 24 just down from the soccer field, is named in honor of the late Don Strauss, founder of Strauss Veal Feeds and Midwest Poultry Services in North Manchester, Ind. The 10,000-square-foot building will house many of the key livestock elements of HU’s agriculture degrees, including large flexible pen space and a classroom. The adaptable space will be equipped to host a variety of livestock to allow students up-close and personal hands-on learning experiences.

Huntington University’s Haupert Institute for Agricultural Studies was launched in 2014. It promotes a Christian perspective on agriculture, which recognizes a responsibility to be good stewards of God’s creation and to examine questions of sustainability and justice.

Areas of specialization:

  1. Agribusiness (Animal Production, Communications & Public Policy, Crop Production, Economics & Finance, Entrepreneurial Small Business Management. Management, Marketing, Ministry & Missions).
  2. Agricultural Education
  3. Animal Science
  4. Crop Science & Agronomy
  5. Pre-Veterinary

The institute welcomed its first students in the fall of 2015. As of this fall, over 50 students are pursuing degrees in the agriculture industry.

It may be the Year of Covid, but Huntington University has set a new enrollment record: 1,402 students, up from 1,393 the previous year. That includes students at the two Indiana campuses (Huntington and Fort Wayne) and at the campus in Peoria, Ariz. Enrollment hit 1300 back in 2016.

For the 8th consecutive year, the number of ethnic minorities from the United States has increased. They now make up 16% of the Huntington University population.

Also, for the fifth consecutive year, the number of states represented has increased. HU students now come from 34 different states.

Says HU President Sherilyn Emberton, “Our entire campus community, at all three geographic locations, worked diligently through the pandemic recess to offer the residential educational experience for our students in the fall of 2020.”

Dr. Carl Zurcher

Dr. Carl Zurcher, professor emeritus of speech, beloved teacher, and theatre director to hundreds of Huntington University students, passed to his eternal reward on September 11, 2020. He taught at Huntington University for 39 years, starting in 1950.

Born on a farm near Berne, Indiana, to Fred F. and Martha (Valentine) Zurcher, Carl graduated as valedictorian from Geneva High School. He began his college education at Huntington University (then College) in 1942 but was interrupted by World War II, where he served with the 104th Infantry (Timberwolf) Division in Holland, France. Returning to HU after the war, he began dating Mabel (Alpaugh) Thompson his senior year and graduated with a degree in speech and history in 1948. He taught at Huntington Township High School for a year and completed a master’s degree at Northwestern University.

In 1950, a position opened in the Speech Department at HU, and Zurcher stated that he “was flattered to be invited to teach at his alma mater.” He accepted the position and began a lifelong devotion to Huntington University, where he taught for 39 years. After completing his first year of teaching at Huntington he married Mabel Thompson in 1951, a marriage of mutual devotion that lasted until her death in 2018. The Zurchers have two daughters, Beverly Ann (Dan) Brauchler and Carla Jeanne Zurcher, both Huntington alumni.

Among the many positions and chairmanships Zurcher held at the institution was his service as registrar from 1953 to 1964 and chair of the Division of Humanities and Bible from 1965 until his retirement. Zurcher was one of the principle faculty members who worked tenaciously for national accreditation in 1961. Zurcher often cited this as one of the highlights of his service to Huntington University. One of the leading members of the faculty, he was always spoken of highly by his colleagues. Dr. Gerald Smith described him as “teacher … exemplar” and “persuasive” in faculty meetings. Dr. William Hasker states, “He was there with a lot of wisdom and judgement, and he would always take the time to work through the problem.”

The impact he had on students was immeasurable. Many have commented on his excellent abilities in teaching and directing, but most of his former students have reflected on the impact this humble Christian gentleman had on their lives. Phrases such as “elegance of wisdom and patience,” “cherished his counsel always and his friendship,” “unconditional love and integrity,” and “taught me my work ethic and my high standards” are just a few of the accolades of those former students who looked up to Dr. “Z” as a mentor and friend. Perhaps former Vice President for University Relations John Paff said it best…“Oh, what a true Christian gentleman! He embodied the values and virtues of Huntington College, modeling ‘Christ, Scholarship, and Service’ to generations of HC and HU students.”

During his years at Huntington University, Dr. Zurcher was recognized many times for his talent and contribution. He was elected four times by the student body as Professor of the Year, received the Alumnus of the Year Award in 1974, was awarded a Centennial Medallion in 1996 and received an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree in 1989. In 2005, the University further paid tribute to Dr. Zurcher by naming the auditorium in the Merillat Centre for the Arts in his honor.

Dr. Carl Zurcher’s life and work can best be summed up with the verses from 1 Corinthians 13:4-7: “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.”

Huntington University is preparing to reopen the campus for the fall semester. All campus activities were suspended in March because of the Covid-19 pandemic. But they’ve been working hard to prepare for a resumption of campus life, which is so important to the HU experience. Students are returning to campus, and classes will start August 31. The plan is to hold in-person classes until Thanksgiving, and then go online for the rest of the semester and January Term. Many other colleges are following the same plan.

In March 2020, Dr. Sherilyn Emberton, President of Huntington University, appointed a Covid-19 Task Force to examine HU’s response to the pandemic. Work groups have been studying the various aspects of college life, with the goal of maintaining a quality academic experience while practicing the highest level of healthy best practices. Many campus protocols and procedures have been put in place. You can read them here.

The University is diligently trying to cover all of the bases…and there are many.

The Centers for Disease Control has recommended using outdoor venues. With that in mind, Huntington University has raised six tents located throughout the campus to provide additional classroom space and social gathering space. These tents will provide safer venues for students, faculty, and staff to still enjoy the HU experience.

The United Brethren church made the tents possible. President Sherilyn Emberton partnered with the UB National Office and denominational churches, and UB people came through to fund the tents. The response was overwhelming.

Although classes don’t start until August 31, a number of student leaders, athletes, and others are already on campus. They began returning August 13. All of the fall sports (soccer, cross country, tennis, golf, and volleyball) are proceeding as scheduled, with competition set to begin in early September. The rest of the students will arrive next week.

In addition to creating more outdoor spaces, the college has posted clear signage in buildings throughout the campus to provide direction for students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Operational guidelines and protocols were developed, and physical preparations were completed. Those include dividers in lab spaces, personal protective equipment supplied to students and employees, classroom capacities limited, and furniture rearranged to ensure distancing.

Keeping Covid-19 out will require a lot of vigilance, but a small school like Huntington has a fighting chance of making it happen. Let’s pray toward that end.

HU Students in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program.

Huntington University received accreditation for its Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) program. This is the nation’s first accredited OTA bachelor’s degree program.

“As the first accredited OTA program in the country, we are able to provide education that is cutting-edge, evidence-based, and state-of-the-art,” said Dr. Nicole Scheiman, OTA department chair and program director. “We can provide advanced education in clinical practice, leadership, and professionalism.”

The five-year accreditation was granted by ACOTE, the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education. Accreditation enables students to take the exam needed to work as a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA).

Having the degree at the bachelor’s level prepares Huntington University graduates for leadership positions that require a bachelor’s degree. Graduates will have a competitive edge in the healthcare arena.

Huntington University’s Class of 2020 will be the first class of students in the nation to graduate with Bachelor of Science degrees in Occupational Therapy Assistant.

Kory Alford has been hired as coach of the Huntington University men’s basketball team. He is the son of Indiana legend Steve Alford, who won the Mr. Basketball award in high school and went on to lead Indiana University to the 1987 NCAA championship.

Kory played under his father at both New Mexico and UCLA, reaching the NCAA tournament all four years (and the Sweet Sixteen twice). He also played on two state championship teams as a high schooler in New Mexico. Most recently, he has been part of the coaching staff at the University of Nevada-Reno.

Said HU Athletic Director Lori Culler, “He brings tremendous knowledge of the game, strong recruiting connections, Indiana family ties and a faith-infused approach to coaching that will enable him to hit the ground running.

Kory said he has always dreamed of leading a basketball program, and it’s truly special being able to lead such a program in his home state of Indiana. “God has blessed me throughout my career in this sport, and I consider it a great privilege to be able to contribute to the Christ-centered mission of Huntington University.”

The video above is a very informative interview with Kory Alford. At the 4:15 mark, he begins telling his faith journey.

 

Tomorrow, November 21, is Day of Giving for Huntington University. The goal is to raise $100,000 on this one day. The Forester Fund supports 93% of students with scholarship assistance.

Keep these matching gift challenges in mind when you make your gift to Huntington University.

Dollar for Dollar: The first $5,000 in total gifts will unlock a matching gift of equal amount. Double your gift by giving early in the day!

First 50: Start the day off right by being one of the first 50 gift-givers. The 50th gift of the day will unlock a $15,000 matching gift!

Foresters Across the Country: Turn your part of the United States green by being the first from your state to make a gift. Every time five states turn green, we’ll unlock $1,500 in matching gifts.

Brand New: New to the Forester Fund? This is the challenge for you! The first 20 first-time gifts on Day of Giving will unlock a $5,000 matching gift.

Set the Pace: Lead the way by making a gift of $1,000 or more. Your gift will set the pace for Day of Giving and grant you membership to the Pacesetter Society, complete with special perks throughout the year. Even better, the first 10 Pacesetter-level gifts will unlock a $10,000 matching gift.

Tomorrow, November 21, a giving form will be available on this page.

L-r: Connie Bonner, Luke Fetters, Jerry Davis, Kay Schwob.

Huntington University announced these personnel changes during the past few months.

Connie Bonner was promoted to Vice President for Finance and Treasurer, effective March 1. She was the Controller for the university 1991-1998, and in 2013 returned to HU as Controller and Director of Financial Services.

Dr. Luke Fetters was named Dean of Graduate and Professional Programs. He had served as interim dean since 2018. He is an HU alumn, an ordained UB minister, and a former UB missionary in Macau. He has filled a variety of roles at HU–teaching undergraduate classes in the ministry and missions department, teacher and curriculum writer for the EXCEL and professional programs, professor of graduate ministry courses, and founding director of HU’s Institute for TESOL Studies. More recently, he used his expertise in intercultural communication and ministry to develop HU’s Global Studies office.

Dr. Jerry Davis returned to the faculty as Director of Clinical Experience. He taught in the graduate counseling program 2007-2017, and has spent the past two years as clinical programs manager at Parkview Behavior Health in Fort Wayne, Ind. He is looking forward to sharing with students the new clinical insights and experiences he has gained.

Kay Schwob was named Director of Development. She has worked at Huntington University for 18 years, including the past two years in the Advancement Office as senior director of advancement operations, and most recently as interim director of advancement.