Randy Carpenter (right) was hired as a staff pastor at Colwood UB church (Caro, Mich.) effective January 1, 2018. He was previously senior pastor of Sunfield UB church (Sunfield, Mich.). Colwood is using a team approach, with three persons–Mike Whipple, Kelly Ball, and Carpenter–listed as teaching pastors. Each also carries other areas of responsibility. For Carpenter, the website lists assimilation and discipleship.

The Garnett UB church (Garnett, Kansas) closed as of December 31, 2017. The building is being sold to another church in town that needs a building. For 2016, the church reported an average attendance of just 6 persons, with 16 members.

Registration is now open for the UB Youth Workers Summit.

Date: April 23-27, 2018 (Monday-Friday)
Location: Best Western Aku Tiki Inn
2225 S Atlantic Ave
Daytona Beach Shores, FL 32118

This is an annual event of encouragement and training for persons in youth ministry. It is available for the lead youth ministry workers (fulltime, part-time, or volunteer) in every United Brethren church. About 25 youth persons usually attend.

The Summit is a great time of networking with other youth leaders and being encouraged by others who are in the trenches of youth ministry. They enjoy the beach, the golf course, and incredibly beautiful weather, along with the chance to slow down and step away from the constant demands of youth ministry.

You can register here.

Cost

  • $25 remote attendee
  • $120 per person (will share room with another attendee)
  • $240 per couple staying in same room
  • $360 per person with private room

What’s Included

  • Hotel stay for 4 nights.
  • Daily hot breakfast buffet.
  • 3 hosted dinners and seminars with guest speakers.

What’s Not Included:

  • Transportation to and from Daytona
  • Lunches and one dinner
  • Excursions
  • Hotel incidentals
  • Spending money

Continuing Education
If you hold a UB ministerial license, by attending this summit, you will earn 20 contact hours, which satisfies your annual requirement.

For more information and to register: ubteens.org


Registration is now open for the Associate Staff Summit.

Date: May 7-11, 2018 (Monday-Friday)
Location: Best Western Aku Tiki Inn
2225 S Atlantic Ave
Daytona Beach Shores, FL 32118

You can register here.

The Associate Staff Summit is held every two years. It is designed for persons in UB churches working in such staff roles as pastoral care, youth ministry, worship, assimilation, adult education, visitation, counseling, missions, discipleship, children’s ministry, etc. It is NOT for senior pastors.

Cost

  • $25 remote attendee
  • $140 per person (will share room with another attendee)
  • $280 per couple staying in same room
  • $375 per person with private room

What’s Included:

  • Hotel stay for four nights (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday)
  • Daily hot breakfast buffet
  • 2 hosted dinners
  • Resource book and seminars

What’s Not Included

  • Transportation to and from Daytona
  • Lunches and 2 dinners
  • Excursions
  • Hotel incidentals and extra days (before or after the summit).

For the schedule and other information: ubstaff.org

Kimberly Schock

Kimberly Schock, 60, passed away on Thursday, January 4, 2018 in Wichita, Kansas. She was the wife of Rev. Richard Schock, pastor of Sabetha UB church (Sabetha, Kansas) since February 2016.

Memorial services will be held at 11 am on Saturday, January 13, at Westview Baptist church, 1325 S. Meridian, Wichita, Kansas.

Cards can be sent to:

Richard Allen Schock
512 Grant
Sabetha, KS 66534

Linda Carter, wife of Rev. Al Carter, passed away around 11 am on Friday, January 5, 2018. She was in hospice after a battle with cancer. Her husband has been pastor of First UB (Columbus, Ohio) since 2011. They previously served UB churches in St. Mary’s and Rockbridge, Ohio.

Visitation: 12:00-1:00 on Tuesday, January 9, 2018.
Funeral: Following visitation
Location: First UB church, 496 S. Wheatland Ave., Columbus, OH 43204

Condolences can be sent to Pastor Carter at this address:

Rev. Alfred Carter
711 Westfall Court
Columbus, OH 43228

The 1833 General Conference provided for establishing a United Brethren publishing house. It took shape in May 1834 in Circleville, Ohio, under the sponsorship of Scioto Conference. William Rinehart, a United Brethren minister in Virginia Conference, had been publishing a paper on his own press called The Mountain Messenger. Scioto asked Rhinehart to move to Circleville to become editor of a United Brethren publication, and they even bought out his little paper.

On December 31, 1834, the first issue of The Religious Telescope was published. It was four pages long, 15-by-22 inches in size. It began as a bi-monthly publication, and started with about 1200 subscribers who paid $1.50 per year. We now had a denominational publication.

John Lawrence, who would become editor in 1852, wrote, “The paper was a very respectable sheet, well edited, yet not popular because of the extreme views which it advocated. It entered largely into the controversies of the times and earnestly and boldly, though not always prudently, marched in the front ranks of every reform.”

Most of the original United Brethren spoke German, and the German language predominated in United Brethren circles into the 1830s. Only two members of the 1821 General Conference were English. Others could preach in English, but German was their mother tongue. The 1821 Discipline was printed in both languages—German on the left, English on the right. It was an acknowledgement of what was coming.

The Germans, because of their unselfish missionary zeal, pretty much worked themselves out of a denomination. They so generously supported and promoted outreach to English people that by the 1830s, we had become (or were becoming) a predominantly English-speaking church. Most of the church’s expansion into the west–Ohio, Indiana, and elsewhere–occurred among English-speaking people.

From the beginning, The Religious Telescope was published in English. However, because of protests from some German-speaking folks that scant attention was being given to the German constituency, we launched a German-language periodical called Die Geschaftige Martha (The Busy Martha). It started in 1840, but ceased after two years. English, even in Pennsylvania, was clearly the future.

In 1885, seeing The Religious Telescope dominated by liberal voices, Milton Wright and others launched an alternative paper. They considered calling it The United Brethren, but instead settled on The Christian Conservator. When Wright’s followers split off, The Christian Conservator became the official publication of the “radical” United Brethren denomination. Its name was changed to The United Brethren in 1954. The magazine was discontinued in 1993.

The Religious Telescope continued until 1946, when the “liberal” UBs merged with the Evangelical Association, which had its own publication called The Evangelical Messenger. The new denomination, called the Evangelical United Brethren Church, merged the two periodicals under the very uncreative name The Telscope-Messenger.

Bethel Mote

Bethel Mote, one of the longest-serving UB missionaries at 22 years, passed away on December 30, 2000. She was 77 years old.

Bethel grew up on a farm near Lake Odessa, Mich., and attended the Pleasant Valley UB church. She spent six terms in Sierra Leone from 1951-1973. Initially, Bethel served as matron at the Minnie Mull Girls School, taking charge of about 100 girls ages 5-13 in a boarding home. Later, she transferred to Bumpe, where she became principal, teacher, and boarding home manager of Bumpe Girls’ School.

Bethel returned to the States in 1973, settling in Lake Odessa and attending her home church of Pleasant Valley. The cause of death was cirrhosis of the liver, which a doctor said probably resulted from malaria she contracted in Sierra Leone.

Dr. M. I. Burkholder in the classroom, teaching current and future United Brethren ministers.

Dr. M. I. Burkholder passed away on December 29, 1987. As dean of the Huntington College Seminary for 30 years, 1942-1972, he helped educate scores of United Brethren ministers, including future bishops.

Dr. Paul Fetters, one of his students, wrote in 1967, “M. I. Burkholder, Th. D., is a man qualified for the office of bishop, but has been needed to serve our church in our Huntington Theological Seminary….The men elected to the high office of bishop for the next several quadrenniums will reflect the influence of Dr. Burkholder.”

Burkholder grew up on a farm and attended a United Brethren church near Shippensburg, Pa. He was converted in 1917 through his pastor, future bishop Ezra M. Funk. He graduated from Huntington College in 1939, completed the Bachelor of Divinity in 1940, and two years later became dean of the HC Theological Seminary. Students not only sat under his teaching, but also under his preaching, since he pastored three different churches in the Huntington area: Union Church, an independent congregation outside of town (1944-1946); College Park Church (1946-1951); and what is now New Hope UB church (1951-1958).

In 1951, Burkholder became the first UB ordained minister to earn a doctorate — the Doctor of Theology from Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. Huntington College added an honorary doctorate in 1978. Dr. Burkholder retired in 1972, and Dr. Fetters took his place as dean of what became the Graduate School of Christian Ministries.